Friday, December 16, 2016

Nathan Philips, The Bay and Eaton's Centre at Christmas Time


As I am sitting here today watching all the snow squalls and freezing temperatures come in, I am so glad Andrew and I booked this visit for Tuesday.  A balmy -10, a great night for a walk around the beautiful city of Toronto looking even more lovely with all it's Christmas lights on and yes a smattering of snow on the ground.  

We headed north from the Go Bus stop and came across one of my favourite trees.  I think I take a picture of this tree every year.  



 The old City Hall is our first destination.  Such a lovely old building.  Built in 1899 and was our City Hall for 66 years, until our new one went up..  Having the 2 of them side by side, the old with the new (the new is now over 50 years old :), displaying the totally different architectural styles of their times is a bonus.

We decided to take a wee detour to go by the Bay/Saks windows when we came across this greenhouse.  It is called the Cloud Gardens Conservatory and won a Governor General's Award for Architecture.



Our first view of the Yonge Street - Bay windows, absolutely beautiful, the detail on the dresses was amazing.  






Next stop the Queen Street side.  This is where Santa's workshop and Christmas Family were, it has been replaced by the Enchanted Forest which is quite darling, but sorry I loved all the little working parts of Santa's workshop and the little elves.  






Next stop on our 10,000 step walk was Nathan Philips Square.  It has been turned into a Christmas Market this year, with lots of eating trucks, including the fresh fried donuts with vanilla gingerbread topping, 12 for $5.  How could we resist, thankfully we didn't eat them all.  I think we left 2 :).



 Another view of the clock tower :)





I do love the Toronto Flag :)






Getting set up for New Years Eve

Here are some interesting fact about Toronto's Christmas Tree.

Toronto's magnificent Christmas tree

The focal point of the annual Cavalcade of Lights celebration is the lighting of Toronto's official Christmas tree. For 2016, the tree will be approximately 18-metres (60-feet) tall and feature around 700 individual ornaments and 3,810 metres of energy efficient lights (525,000 lights). 

Interesting facts about Toronto's Official Christmas tree

  • The tree is selected a year in advance from the Bancroft, Ontario area.
  • The tree is usually a white spruce.
  • The tree arrives on a flatbed truck and is lifted into place with cranes.
  • It takes a crew of eight people three to four hours to put the tree into place.
  • The tree needs three days to settle before it can be decorated.
  • It takes two weeks to decorate and string lights on the tree.
  • Countless pieces of large machinery, including a cherry picker, are used to assist the decorating crew in placing each ornament onto the tree.
  • Unlike an indoor tree, Toronto's Christmas tree does not need watering.
  • Usually the tree is 15 to 18 metres tall (55 to 65 feet).
  • The tree remains on display throughout the holiday season and is then recycled.
Toronto’s Official Christmas Tree sponsored by Hudson's Bay and powered by Toronto Hydro.

AND IT'S BEAUTIFUL :)



Starting to get a wee bit chilly, especially the hands.  Off to the Eaton's Centre to check out all their lights.



I gather this is the biggest indoor tree in Canada.  





Selfie Time :)

Time for dinner, we head across the bridge to the Bay/Saks to stay warm.  If anyone is wondering what to get me for Christmas, these shoes are only $1200.  I presume that's for 2.  A bargain :)


The new Pusateri's market.  The produce looked amazing.


Just a word of warning for anyone going for a walk with Andrew down the city.  We crossed the bridge, as we were heading south to the lake, went through a tunnel, came up some stairs and somehow ended up north east of where we started.  We basically went in a circle but came up on the east side of Yonge.  LOL   Let's hope Santa doesn't hire him to replace Rudolph.  :)



Next stop fish and chips at my favourite building in Toronto, the old Flat Iron Building (also know as the Gooderham building).  They have a Filly and Firkin in the basement (great fish and chips), feels like you are in a pub in England.  

Thanks Andrew for a great night.  xo


2 comments:

  1. Im available if you need a 3rd wheel

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    Replies
    1. Always need a third wheel, especially if it is you :)

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